LEVERAGING CULTURE COMPETENCY AND COLLABORATION STRATEGIES PART 2

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LEVERAGING CULTURE COMPETENCY AND COLLABORATION STRATEGIES PART 2

Contest cultures tend to focus on defining expected results and letting the project team establish the process and fill in the details.  The problem with decisions based on targets is that it favors heuristics, and rule-of-thumb behavior can lead to false-positives. For example, once reaching the determined quota the process typically stops. In contrast, most High Power Distance cultures prefer establishing a clear sequence, and Well-Oiled Machines (even though low power) also value systematic approaches. These cultures are more likely to question how much time is worth the effort in the initiative and apply sophisticated algorithms to maximize efficiencies. Instead of stopping when a target number is reached it may be more advantageous to plan the timing.

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LEVERAGING CULTURE COMPETENCY AND COLLABORATION STRATEGIES PART 1

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LEVERAGING CULTURE COMPETENCY AND COLLABORATION STRATEGIES PART 1

Abstract

A multi-national company is a melting pot of cultural values. All managers, not just CFOs, need to appreciate the influence local culture has on shaping global business processes and corporate culture.

As an engineer of room and open-space collaboration systems, I look for ways to improve the design and deployment of technology to enhance innovation and productivity. The influence of regional cultures on product adoption is particularly interesting, since our deployment strategies are typically global. While cultural sensitivity is a timely topic, there is still little research on how to capitalize on regional values when implementing collaborative technology. The reality is that  cultural norms are always in transition and huddle spaces are a relatively new phenomenon. 

 

How global companies continue to change and innovate is dependent on several cultural dynamics. This article focuses on the influence of culture on change management. Gaining culture competency is the first step to successfully installing collaboration spaces on a global scale.   

 

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The rule of 3 and 10

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The rule of 3 and 10

Libin’s reference to Mikitani's theory that changes occur roughly every third and tenth expansion is highly relevant to product development surrounding collaboration strategies and prioritizing process revisions based on anticipating when deficiencies will occur. For example, the same process for supporting 30 annotation systems will not be as effective when there are 300, and will certainly need to change when that number climbs to 3000. The salient point is to resist making technology and support changes prematurely; wait until these critical markers are on the horizon. There is a tendency for changes in unified communication technology, which are occurring much more rapidly than adoption, to drive our production cycle decisions. Based on Mikitani's theory, we could be much more articulate in our measurement of when change will be most effective. Perhaps we can resist the urge for the next big thing and allow existing processes to diminish marginally provided we strategically anticipate imperative future attention.

TURNING POINT is Mark Peterson's personal take on innovation and collaboration influencing today's corporate strategy. To have a conversion about what takes to implement collaborative solutions efficiently and at enterprise scale, contact Mark Peterson

Reference

Libin, Phil (2015). The rule of 3 and 10. Sequoia. Retrieved from https://www.sequoiacap.com/grove/posts/yrpg/the-rule-of-3-and-10

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IT interpretation of a Thomasson

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IT interpretation of a Thomasson

Akesagawa saw metaphors of Thomasson’s maintained uselessness reflected in urban settings in Tokyo, such as old train crossing gate motors that have no arms, alongside new gates, and both are dutifully maintained; stairway railing without steps, or concrete steps carefully attended but going nowhere (Roman, 2014). Akesegowas’ 1985 book Hyperart: Thomasson generated significant social media actively, and the term Thomasson entered popular culture. 

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Edgeless Media requires edgleless support

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Edgeless Media requires edgleless support

Give credit to Arrive (arrivesys.com) for coming up with the term “edgeless media” as it will soon become common vernacular to describe achieving end-to-end collaborative product portfolios. In the very near future, all elements of video and graphics sharing infrastructure, including endpoints, cameras, displays and content management systems will achieve a level of practical interoperability, delivered by service providers as turn-key solutions. The challenge is that the while the products that go into edgeless solutions are inexpensive, traditional support models do not scale well against the low cost of entry. Successful implementation of an edgeless experience requires closing the fissures in the enterprise help desk, previous designs that maximize efficiency are counterproductive for supporting unified collaboration technologies.

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COLLABORATION SPACES TRANSFORM SPIDER WEBS INTO CORAL REEFS

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COLLABORATION SPACES TRANSFORM SPIDER WEBS INTO CORAL REEFS

Let us discuss the unrelenting demand to be productive and competitive and the value of building technology habitats that foster innovation and collaboration. Back in 2006, Brafmin and Beckstrom identified the need for organizations to behave more like a starfish than spiders as means of adapting to change in the environment. Fast forward to today and threat of cyber-attack reinforces the importance of transferring knowledge and solving problems creatively. Global leaders now manage hundreds of starfish teams, all moving rapidly along on the periphery of the organization’s ecosystem, given decision-making autonomy, sidestepping each other and corporate bureaucracy. Starfish communities require interconnecting geographically dispersed teams through a porous “society” of desktop collaboration and team touchdown stations.  

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